oh, let's have an adventure.

Here I am. Flynn you like a hurricane.

ingodwetrustnyc:

that-guy-owen:  Great whiskey advertisement

ingodwetrustnyc:

that-guy-owen:  Great whiskey advertisement

putonyourbathingsuits:

Photos by Deirdre O’Callaghan

I really loved this film.

mensahdemary:

giganticworlds:

Long live literary grumps

sassy nabokov

mensahdemary:

giganticworlds:

Long live literary grumps

sassy nabokov

millionsmillions:

Why do we reread novels obsessively as children but hardly ever as adults? At The Morning News, Clay Risen discusses why rereading appeals to children so much. “It was a residual sense of wonder, left over long after I had accepted that the reality on the page and the reality beyond it are distinct.” Pair with: Our essay on the pleasures and perils of rereading.

millionsmillions:

Why do we reread novels obsessively as children but hardly ever as adults? At The Morning News, Clay Risen discusses why rereading appeals to children so much. “It was a residual sense of wonder, left over long after I had accepted that the reality on the page and the reality beyond it are distinct.” Pair with: Our essay on the pleasures and perils of rereading.

kirstenstubbs:

LOL.

Totes GIFable

kirstenstubbs:

LOL.

Totes GIFable

15 Antiquated Words for “Happy” We Should Bring Back

nevver:

  1. “CHIRKY”
    From the late 19th century, meaning “cheerful.”
  2. “IN HIGH SNUFF”
    An expression for “good mood,” used from the late 17th century until the 1930s.
  3. “OVER THE MOON”
    Before humans literally went beyond the moon, this popular phrase from the 1930s means “overjoyed.”
  4. “GASSED”
    Started out meaning “intoxicated,” but by the 1950s it just meant happy.
  5. “TICKLED”
    As in “tickled pink.”
  6. “MERRY-PIN”
    Also started as a reference to tipsiness, this referred to a general good ol’ time in the 19th century.
  7. “RICOCHET”
    In the 19th century, this bouncy term also meant “splendid.”
  8. “ALL CALLAO”
    This 19th century sailor’s slang either referred to the Peruvian port of Callo or acted as a play on the word alcohol. Or both.
  9. “GAUDEAMUS”
    From the Latin for “let us rejoice,” this oldie refers to a merry jamboree.
  10. “KVELLING”
    From the Yiddish for “so happy and proud my heart is overflowing.”
  11. “CHUFFED”
    This current slang in the UK certainly needs to make a trip across the pond.
  12. “DELIRA AND EXCIRA”
    A term the Irish use to mean “delirious and excited.” We need to borrow this one too.
  13. “GLADSOME”
    This classic from the 14th century doesn’t get used enough anymore.
  14. “TO LICK THE EYE”
    This confusing 19th century gem was used to describe someone who was extremely pleased.
  15. “COCK-A-HOOP”
    From the phrase “to set the cock on the hoop,” meaning open the tap and let the good times flow.

Clap along if you feel like Cock-A-Hoop is the truth…

On Returning, by Sarah Flynn

fwrictionreview:

There’s a saying and there’s a reason why you say it: if you love something, let it go. Is there a saying about what to do when that thing just keeps coming back to you? I don’t know about you, but I have a couple of boomerangs I need to account for.   

Let’s talk about it in the same way we talk about New York: we’ve made an entire writing genre out of leaving the city. It is true that it’s impossible to write about being in New York without it becoming a central character; it is equally true that leaving it seems to necessitate words. Still, Joan Didion did it before you and she did it better: first by immortalizing her departure in “Goodbye To All That,” and later by returning sans fanfare. It’s not that you were wrong to leave, it’s that you were foolish to think you might not come back.

New York demands feeling. It doesn’t give a damn what that feeling is as long as you feel something. It never crossed my mind until I found myself living there, but once I got there it changed my heart so hard that I never thought to leave. Here’s how it got me: at eighteen, what I cared most about was music, and it took all of a week in the city for me to see Tori Amos in Central Park rehearsing “Crucify” on the piano for Good Morning America. By the time she personally handed me a bagel, it was all over for anywhere else. New York held connections to worlds I never thought I could be a part of: worlds as complicated and heart-wrenching as the city I loved.

Read More

this is meeeeee

fwriction:

flynnwaslike's song selection—to accompany her essay, “On Returning”—for fwriction : review’s Waffle-Rocking Playlist

fredlagonbleu:

Bruce, born to USA

spending a lot of time with this guy today

fredlagonbleu:

Bruce, born to USA

spending a lot of time with this guy today

whatkristensmells:

This is what happens when you move to Provincetown.

whatkristensmells:

This is what happens when you move to Provincetown.